Extractions

Through discussion you and I have decided that there is a tooth in your mouth that requires extracting, and you have agreed to have this treatment done.  Teeth require extracting because they are:

  • Too badly broken down to be saved, either through decay or fracture
  • Heavily abscessed and the person does not want a root filling
  • Wisdom teeth that are causing problems
  • Very loose due to gum disease
  • Damaged by gum disease and cannot be saved

Things to remember:

Extractions are a surgical procedure.  It is the removal of an organ of your body.  Sometimes teeth come out easily.  Some times it is more difficult, and may require a specialist called an Oral Surgeon.

Whilst we do everything we can to limit the chances of you getting an infection after your extraction (sterile instruments, sterile gloves etc) research shows that up to 1 in 10 extraction sockets (the hole left in your jaw when the tooth is removed) will experience an infection or other problem.  This is because there are billions of bacteria that live in the mouth, and bacteria can cause infection.

YOU MUST NOT SMOKE THE DAY BEFORE, THE DAY OF AND SEVERAL DAYS AFTER YOUR EXTRACTION.

We advise you to start rinsing your mouth out with Corsodyl 3 times a day (mornings, lunch time and evening) 3 days before your extraction date if this is possible

If you are on Warfarin, we need to coordinate the day of your extraction so that it is within 72 hours of you having your INR checked.  If you are taking Aspirin it is important that you not take this on the day of the extraction

We will give you instructions which will help limit your risk of complications

If you experience pain that occurs as soon as the numbess wears off, this pain is due to inflammation and is usually temporary.  If it persists, you should phone us.

Inflammation is the pain you get when you bang your toe.  This is not uncommon, and is normally best controlled by pain killers, of which IBUPROFEN is the most affective.  PARACETAMOL is another pain killer of choice, as is ASPIRIN (you should only take pain killers if it is safe for you to do so, and never exceed the recommended dose).  On the day of the extraction due to the risk of bleeding, Paracetamol is the only pain killer you should use however.

If you experience pain that comes on after a few days, this is usually infection.  Infection is caused by bacteria, and is best dealt with either by antibiotics and the application of sedative dressing in the surgery.  Please phone us on 01494 455900

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